Training Your Eyes

What’s the most effective way to achieve faster lap times?
There is no silver bullet to bring big gains in performance. One driver benefits from being smoother while another gains with quicker inputs. Practicing alternate lines also can yield faster laps. Of course, data analysis is fundamental to pick up speed and time. Nonetheless, the most common limiting factor is how a driver uses his eyes.
You can’t get around the track without your eyes. You look for references on the track, for traffic, for passing opportunities, etc. Yet do you pay attention to where you direct your eyes? Ask yourself how far ahead do you look? How long do you focus on one reference before moving to the next? Generally, drivers don’t look far enough ahead.
This has consequences in speed and safety. A driver not looking through the corner may be surprised by debris or a spun car. A driver caught

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Competition License

Q: Why is it that even after I complete my provisional competition license, I still have to run four more races to remove the rookie marks and orange plate?
A: According to the Club Codes and Regulations you are required to display and orange plate and “R” decals for the first eight races. This let’s more experienced drivers know that you are a rookie. The faster driver may take that into account when deciding where to pass the rookie driver. A rookie, by definition, will have a provisional license. Once a rookie finishes four clean races and gets the four races signed off by the race director, they still have display the rookie decals and plate for four more races, even though they have received a hard-card license. Having a provisional license to give to the race director during the first four races, allows the race director a means to watch

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2016 NASA Western States Championships Presented by Toyo Tires Crowns Champions

The third annual NASA Western States Championships presented by Toyo Tires is in the books, with Championship races having been run at Buttonwillow Raceway today.
Under picture perfect California weather, 75-degrees and sunny, the 250+ NASA Championship racers started the day with the national anthem. The first group took to the track at 9:40 a.m. with Spec E30 and 944 Spec starting the Championship races.
Spec E30
Justin Ross, pole sitter, brought the Spec E30 field to the standing start line in his No. 80 BMW. Ross had a great launch at the drop of the green, getting nearly a car length lead going into Turn 1. Ross was followed closely in the early going by No. 55 Michael Mihld. By lap three, Friday qualifying race winner Michael Shawhan moved into the runner spot in the No. 152 BMW. As Mihld and Shawhan took up the battle for second, Ross was able to

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